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Don’t Sleep On Vince Staples’ Style

Staples has some of the best style staples that any average Joe can pull off.

Rappers aren't often known for being subtle when it comes to their wardrobes. Young Thug, of course, is turning into the patron saint of a more-is-more aesthetic, creating a world where wearing a dress (and destroying some gender norms) on the cover of his latest album Jeffery just seems par for the course. Future's love of finely-crafted hats and streamlined sunglasses are rivaled only by his passion for silk shirts, while Wiz Khalifa wears Gucci and Thom Browne better than almost any rapper we've seen. Newcomers like Lil Uzi Vert, Lil Yachty and Playboi Carti have out-of-this-world hair and clothes to match, from rarified vintage Raf Simons to old school Polo piled on top of the latest/coolest sneakers on the planet. And Kanye West's vintage T-shirts, sweatpants, and sneakers are the high-fashion dad style that swaths of men can't get enough of. But if you're looking to the hip-hop scene for some style inspiration, it's actually 23-year-old Vince Staples who has the coolest, chillest, and most affordable style in the game right now.

Chill Graphic Tees

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Getty/Theo Wargo

We're living in the golden age of graphic tees. Vintage rock tees are insanely popular, skateboard style at its all-time peak and merch more popular than ever. Vince Staples is more a fan of this new crop of tees from labels like Supreme and Born x Raised, opting for styles that have skate cred and aren't too over-the-top. Vince won't be seen in a reptile-print tee done up in pink silk. His T-shirts are also in classic colors and feature interesting, but more importantly, well-designed graphics.

Converse Chuck Taylors

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Tim Mosenfelder/Getty Images

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Christopher Polk/Getty Images

Converse Chuck Taylors are undeniably cool, and their classic style has been an a part of American culture for over 100 years. Sure, there are Flyknits and Yeezys and $500 high-fashion sneakers being released every day, but Staples only wears Chucks. In fact, we can't seem to find a photo of him wearing any other sneaker but Chuck Taylors this year. We're always a fan of men who can commit to one specific thing like this amidst a fickle fashion climate, whether it's Riccardo Tisci's dedication to Air Force 1s or Tyler, the Creator's unwavering desire to wear Vans. And like those other sneaker classics, Chuck Taylors literally look good with everything.

Plain Champion Hoodies

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Thomas Cooper/WireImage

On the heels of a recent collaboration with white-hot fashion brand Vetements, Champion is no longer just the middle of America sweatshirt de rigueur. The brand's iconic "C" logo is now considered totally acceptable in even the most snobby of fashion circles. Like T-shirts, lots of streetwear labels use Champion hoodies to get their own logos into the world. Staples wears those too, but he's at his best when wearing some unadorned Champion fleece.

Straight Fit Levis

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Kevin Winter/Getty Images for FYF

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Andrew Benge/Redferns

Nothing looks better with Chucks than a pair straight-fit Levi's. Immortalized by their numeric distinction—501—they are a style that will be here long after pre-ripped knees and ultra-wide cuts are gone. Vince doesn't just opt for the dark denim, though. He has pairs of Levi's in brown canvas and black denim as well, which are a simple way to break up all that indigo (and to keep people from thinking you wear the same pair of pants all the time).

Dad Style Swerves

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The most unexpected style move in Staples' arsenal: Dad moves. The way he pulls off dad style moves like cardigans and tucked in T-shirts. Sure, his cardigans might be from Supreme and tucked-in T-shirts are one of the most common style moves of 2016, but Staples pulls them off without it looking forced. And it takes a real pro to look comfortable in what is the next-level T-shirt tuck, the tucked-in polo shirt.

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